Batman: Arkham City
PC (2011) - PlayStation 3/Xbox 360 (2011) - Wii U (2012) - PlayStation 4/Xbox One (2016)

With the bar set after Arkham Asylum's release, the follow-up sequel Arkham City decided to kick that bar higher up and expanded both the combat system and the playground to a bigger part of Gotham.

The game is riddled (get it?) with many references that are hidden in plain sight all over Gotham. It's not only incredibly fun to fly around the city; taking out bad guys is a blast as well, with all the different gadgets Batman rocks on his belt.

 


Catherine
PC (2019) - PlayStation 3/Xbox 360 (2011) - PlayStation 4 (2019) - Nintendo Switch (2020)

When you come across one of those games that just takes a silly concept and throws you a curveball with how hilarious and absorbant it is, then you get Catherine. If you haven't heard of this game yet, then you must have been living under the pillow since 2011.

If you think that a mysterious curse, on men that cheat on their girlfriends and wives, mysteriously die, not able to wake up from their sleep in a sheep state by not passing the puzzle trial sounds appealing to you, then make sure to pick this up immediately.


L.A. Noire
PC (2011) - PlayStation 3/Xbox 360 (2011) - PlayStation 4/Xbox One (2017) - Nintendo Switch (2017)

While Grand Theft Auto is one of the most successful game franchises out there, Rockstar had another trick up its sleeve when it released L.A. Noire. The game felt like discovering a new place but feeling right at home, due to various similarities to the GTA franchise.

While feeling very familiar, the game brought forth some stellar storytelling, incredible face-animations and the intriguing interrogation mechanic. With the recent additional release of the VR Case Files - which brings a few cases from the original into the realm of virtual reality - we can only hope for a sequel

 


Portal 2
PC (2011) - PlayStation 3/Xbox 360 (2011)

After the success of Portal, its sequel - Portal  2 - brought us a lot more than just the same type of puzzles. Adding Co-op mode, a variety of materials to shoot against walls so you can slide or bounce to your destination and the option to create and play custom maps, the game delivers more than just an expansion onto the first game.

Oh, and let's not forget the return of our beloved GLaDOS. Did I hear someone say there was cake..?


Shogun 2: Total War
PC (2011)

A direct sequel to Creative Assembly's 2000 Total War: Shogun, Shogun 2 took the best parts of the Total War franchise and culminated it into a highly balanced game that has a tactical based system that is unmatched to date.

While Warhammer: Total War has a comprehensive campaign map and boosted to a ludicrous scale in Warhammer 2: Total War (if you owned both copies), its scale and content alone isn't enough to see the armies of Samurai and Warrior Monks duking it out on the battlefield while raining death upon them all from afar.

 


The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim
PC (2011) - PlayStation 3/Xbox 360 (2011) - PlayStation 4/Xbox One (2016) - Nintendo Switch (2017)

Memes aside, Skyrim is one of the best open-world games we've ever seen. It's been ported many times - it can even be played on Amazon's Alexa - and there is a good reason for it. A stunning, rich world filled with varieties of characters and quests have given us a ridiculous amount of hours of gameplay and that doesn't even include finishing the main storyline.

As one of the most beloved games ever made, Skyrim gave us tons of content that, even after multiple playthroughs, does not disappoint in revealing new things you did not know before. Did I mention yet that there are dragons in it?


Trine 2
PC (2011) - PlayStation 3/Xbox 360 (2011) - PlayStation 4 (2013) - Nintendo Switch (2019) - Nintendo Wii U (2012) - Nvidia Shield (2014)

While Trine brought about a new age of platforming, Trine 2 took the concept much further and made the world look incredibly beautiful.

What made us put this on our list was its phenomenal story with its stellar graphics, fluid action combat with very smart puzzle-solving that requires all characters to play their parts to progress to the next stage.

If there's one thing that a game like Ori and the Blind Forest owes to, it's the Trine series.